Everything listed under: End-of-life

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    Can We Talk … About Death?

    By Ann Oldenburg for Next AvenueKatie Couric has regrets. Even to this day.When the former TV news anchor spoke at Georgetown University at an event titled “The Healing Power of Communication” in August, 2019, she said she wished she had talked more to her late husband, Jay Monahan, about his impending death before he succumbed to colon cancer at 42 in 1998.“It was just terrible,” Couric said. “After nine months of trying desperately to figure out some way to m...  Read More...

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    8 Reasons You May Need to Update Your Will

    By Patrick O'Brien for Next AvenueYour will may be the most important document you’ll ever write. Problem is, after many of us draft one, we put it somewhere for safekeeping and don’t look at it again. That can be a big mistake.Lives change.   Read More...

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    A Dying Fish, A Son’s Wish

    By Marc Silver for Next AvenueThis is a story about an unlikely mix of topics: running, music, mothers, aging and a stranded blowfish.I was on an early morning run along the beach in Cape May, N.J. during a three-day getaway. It was a great run.   Read More...

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    When Families Keep the Truth From Their Dying Loved Ones

    By Larry Patten for Next Avenue(This is a personal essay by retired pastor Larry Patten, who now works in a Fresno, Calif., hospice facility.)Answering the innocent question of what I do for a living can kill a conversation.I work in hospice services, and have visited people in their homes, hospitals and skilled nursing facilities when they have months or weeks to live.Even our patients and families want to avoid talking about my job. Often enough, a hospice staff member is asked to not wear his...  Read More...

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    A Daunting Task: Cleaning Out a Late Loved One’s Home

    By Randi Mazzella for Next AvenueAfter a parent or another loved one dies, one of the hardest tasks is cleaning out their home. Whether or not it’s the home you grew up in, the house or apartment will likely hold some memories and going through the contents can be emotionally draining.John D. Moore, a licensed psychotherapist in Chicago and editor of Guy Counseling, says, “In many cases, the child (or children) of the deceased aren’t properly prepared for the torrent of emotion...  Read More...