Everything listed under: Caregiving

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    Love for Cats Connects Mother and Daughter

    By Christine Schoenwald for Next AvenueWhy is it, no matter how old we are, there’s a part of us which continues to seek our parent’s approval?My mother never was the kind of parent who believed that everything her child did was extraordinary or brilliant. A couple of years ago, I wrote a personal essay about my late father and his fantastic sense of humor. I thought my mother would enjoy reading it — they had been divorced several years at the time of his death, but she always appreciated how f...  Read More...

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    ‘End Game’ Film Shows the Struggle in End-of-Life Decisions

    By Deborah Quilter for Next AvenueIn a pivotal scene of the documentary End Game, we listen in as a team of palliative care professionals discusses Mitra, a 45-year-old woman who is dying of cancer. Should they approach her about hospice? The hospital chaplain urges the group not to bring it up.   Read More...

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    How to Find the Right Words for Someone in Hospice

    By Kevyn Burger for Next AvenueAfter spending 15 years researching the best ways to support people whose lives end in hospice, professor Elizabeth Bergman has advice for friends, neighbors, family members and co-workers who want to send them a final, poignant message: Mail cards, but choose them carefully.“Please don’t send a ‘get well’ card,” pleads Bergman, chair of Ithaca College’s Gerontology Institute.By its very definition, hospice is for patients who will not get well. Patients enter hosp...  Read More...

  • Advice for Long-Distance Caregiving Challenges

    By Debbie Swanson for Next AvenueAfter successfully completing cancer treatments, Julie Eaton’s 81-year-old father wanted to resume living on his own at his home in Albuquerque, N.M. The family, scattered around Kentucky, California and New Mexico, enlisted professional services as well as technology to support his wishes. “(When he passed), every one of us said how technology helped us take care of our dad, no matter where we were,” Eaton says.In a survey released by AARP, 87 ...  Read More...

  • 16-Year-Old Author Writes Story of Love and Dementia

    By Julie Pfitzinger for Next AvenueThe subtitle for Grandpa and Lucy, a book by 16-year-old author Edie Weinstein, says it all: A Story About Love and Dementia. In this charming picture book, the main character, a young girl named Lucy, employs simple and loving gestures to strengthen the bond she has with her grandfather as signs of his Alzheimer’s disease begin to affect their close relationship.Weinstein, who lives in St. Paul, Minn.  Read More...